Monthly Archives: May 2013

Scoliosis: The Schroth Method

Schroth-Method-2We are very excited to announce that our Therapist, Carola Monroe is now certified as a Schroth Scoliosis Therapist. There are less than 50 American therapists who are trained in this method and
Carola is one of the few New York based therapists who is a certified Schroth Scoliosis Preactitioner. As a result , we are seeing more and more scoliosis patients around the practice.

What is the Schroth Method for Scoliosis Treatment?

The Schroth method is a conservative physical therapy approach for people with scoliosis. It is used to treat patients of all ages as a measure mainly to prevent surgery, and also before and after surgery.

Used successfully in Europe since the 1920s, the Schroth method was originally developed in Germany by scoliosis sufferer, Katharina Schroth. She developed this program to counteract scoliosis deformities. The program has been the primary treatment method for Scoliosis in Europe for many years.

The method is based upon the concept of scoliosis as resulting from a complex of muscular asymmetries (asymmetric weight bearing or loading of the spine) that can be at least partially corrected by targeted exercises.

The Schroth Method first assesses and classifies the patient’s curve. Following this, the patient is taught exercises that are specific to his or her curve. The exercises are designed to help the patient counter the effects of gravity and uneven muscle pulls on their spines. They learn to correct their postural positions by incorporating exercises during their activities of daily living.

Click here for more information

Painless Parenting the Radio Show

Move Forward Radio Marianne Ryan PT, OCS is interviewed by Move Forward Radio on the subject of Painless Parenting.

“Parenting provides challenges but it doesn’t have to be a pain. In this episode, Marianne Ryan PT, OCS discusses how to help parents avoid the minor aches and pains – and even significant injuries – that sometimes occur during pregnancy and after childbirth”.

Tell me what you think?

Click below to listen to the show:

Listen to Move Forward Radio’s segment about Painless Parenting or dowload the podcast on Itunes.

Common Pregnancy Pains. Did you know..?

shutterstock_82822033 Pregnant backMoms you are not alone!
Did you know “Fifty percent to 70% of pregnant women experience low back pain during pregnancy. In addition, 30% to 50% of pregnant women report low back pain severe enough to cause lost time from work. It’s more manageable, however, than most women (and their doctors) think”.

Did you know that physical therapy treatment is the best way to get rid of and to prevent back pain while pregnant?

Move Forward PT posted some great tips on how to avoid and treat pregnancy aches and pains:  Click Here

http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail.aspx?cid=8d523b23-9f02-4ac7-a107-c464ae6840b2

Wanna’ Get That Pre-Baby Body Back? Here are 5 Tips:

Woman Lifting DumbbellThis is a summary of a good article that I helped write for Move Forward PT. (see link below)

“While moderate weight gain is a common concern for women during and after pregnancy, there are many other factors to consider in the 4 to 6 weeks after childbirth. You may want to get back into pre-pregnancy shape immediately, but it is important to make a slow return to full activity.”

Here are some “tips on what you can do in the first 6 weeks after delivery to begin getting your body back into pre-pregnancy shape.”

  1. Get help with tasks. During the first 6 post-partum weeks DO NOT LIFT ANYTHING HEAVIER THEN YOUR BABY.
  2. Breathe. Your diaphragm works as a breathing muscle and is a major core muscle. Breathing exercises will help you to restore stability in your trunk and to regain tone in your core muscles, so you can achieve that flat tummy look.
  3. Focus on your core. After birth woman’s abdominal muscles are stretched out and can sometimes develop a separation, called diastasis recti.  During the first 6 weeks you can do some gentle Kegel and breathing exercises to get a jump start on your recovery. Avoid activities that put pressure on your abdomen such as getting out of bed by doing a sit up. A physical therapist can prescribe exercises to help “close the gap” between muscles.
  4. Strengthen abdominal and pelvic floor muscles.  Women can do gentle Kegel (pelvic floor) exercises immediately after childbirth, whether the birth was vaginal or by caesarian section. Strengthening the pelvic floor also can improve sexual satisfaction and help prevent incontinence.
  5. Every minute counts. Try to incorporate fitness into your everyday routines—such as taking a family walk around the neighborhood or doing your kegel and breathing exercises while you are nursing or feeding your baby. New moms should sleep whenever they have the opportunity.

Click here for the full article

http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail.aspx?cid=4064e184-e3bf-473e-a002-e814a8aa4050

Ergonomic Parenting: Best Ways to Prepare or Adapt Your Nursery

“The months following the birth of a child are some of the most rewarding for new parents—and the most challenging to a new parent’s body”.

Baby LiftingHere are some great tips from an article I helped to write for the American Physical Therapy Association on how using proper body mechanics within an ergonomically friendly nursery can help ease the strains and stresses of parenting.

Click here to read the full article.

http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail.aspx?cid=3cb64c31-3803-4f97-b516-b87fa7e3d5db

One Third of Childbirth Repair Surgery Fails?….Why?

shutterstock_55118254By Marianne Ryan PT, OCS
Clinical Director MRPT Physical Therapy

Did you know that “a common surgery often performed to repair damage caused by childbirth fails one-third of patients within seven years, a new study shows”?

Yup, it is the surgery women have done to cure incontinence and other problems caused by pelvic organ prolapse (POP), which often occurs as a result of childbirth.

An article written by Liz Szabo, for USA Today, goes on to explain:

1. “In nearly one-third of cases, surgical repair failed or women saw symptoms return”

2. “About 225,000 women undergo some kind of pelvic organ prolapse surgery each year”

3. “Some surgeries can be prevented; pelvic physical therapy can cure many milder cases”

Szabo also mentioned “about one in four women suffer either prolapse or incontinence at some point, and studies show that 11% to 19% of women undergo surgery for it.”

Let me repeat: 25% of all women develop incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse. That is one out of four of your female friends!

Cheryl Iglesia of the Georgetown University School of Medicine was quoted in Szabo’s article as saying, vaginal deliveries increase the risk of developing pelvic organ prolapse (POP), and in the future doctors will need to perform C-sections rather then vaginal deliveries for women at high risk for prolapse.

Yikes! Iglesia’s answer to the problem is more surgery and more C-sections?

What about more physical therapy?

The article does mention that studies show that “pelvic physical therapy, which includes Kegel exercises that strengthen pelvic floor muscles, can reverse many mild cases of prolapse”, but there is no mention on how pelvic physical therapy can prevent POP. There are also studies that show pelvic physical therapy can reduce the level of prolapse, for example reduce a grade 3 to a grade 2, etc.

If pelvic physical therapy can reverse pelvic organ prolapse, why aren’t women knocking down my door to get physical therapy treatment? 

Why? Because I don’t think we take postpartum recovery seriously in our country. Women traditionally receive excellent prenatal and obstetric care during delivery, but postpartum care is lacking. 6 Weeks after delivery, women are usually given a pat on the back and told “good job done” and that they can resume sexual activity. What about postpartum rehabilitation? In our country women are left to fend on their own after delivery.

In other countries, such as France, they take postnatal care seriously. Did you know all French women receive free physical therapy after they give birth. I have been told by some of my patients that postpartum physical therapy is “mandatory” in France and they go for about 20 visits focusing on rehabilitating the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles after every baby they deliver. 
In a light hearted article written by Claire Lundberg, “The French Government Wants to Tone My Vagina”, for Slate Magazine, Lundberg discusses the positive experience she had with the French postpartum rehabilitation program called la rééducation périnéale and how she was glad “a medical professional was paying attention to what happened down there.”

What about more physical therapy after one of these surgeries?

Did you know that after having surgery for pelvic organ prolapse most women do not receive pelvic physical therapy?

I recently asked a urogynocologist, who refers patients to my practice, why she did not refer her patients to physical therapy after preforming these types of surgeries. The answer was that she did not think it was necessary, and was not convinced that physical therapy would help the patient recover. 
It is common practice to go for physical therapy treatment after surgery on other body parts, like the shoulder or knee; why isn’t is considered part of the rehabilitation process with pelvic surgeries? 
If surgeons started sending their patients for physical therapy treatment after prolapse surgery; doesn’t it follow logic that it would help them reach better outcomes? Maybe physical therapy treatment could prevent surgical failures? 
(Just in case you didn’t know, you can go directly to a physical therapist without a doctor’s referral in most states.)

More surgery is not the answer. More physical therapy is the key to solving pelvic organ prolapse. 

References:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/05/22/common-pelvic-surgery/2325055/

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/family/2012/02/postnatal_care_in_france_vagina_exercises_and_video_games.html

 

Moms Want to Run Again? Read This.

This is a great video by one of my colleagues, Julie Wiebe PT … she teaches ladies how to get that “running grove” back on:

Are you trying to get back into running? Do you have a little problem “down there”, like incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse? Are you a mom and anxious to get your baby body back in shape? Watch this video for tips on how to safely return to running.

Learn how to lean into the hill or down the hill when you run.

If you are a city dweller like me, don’t worry if you use a treadmill, just increase the incline slightly and you will be working out your “Core Muscles”.